Can CBD oil help relieve your nausea

Most CBD studies on its role in nausea maximize chemotherapy which is characterized by vomiting and nausea. The studies are promising and show potential in CBD oil for nausea, but more research is needed before recommending CBD oil for the condition. This article takes the reader through what they need to know about CBD oil and nausea.

Many people experience nausea when traveling, stressed, or when they stay hungry for long. Besides, nausea is a major problem that cancer patients who have undergone chemotherapy have to deal with. Because it is accompanied by vomiting in most cases, it can lower one’s quality of life, especially when the stomach cannot hold food. Meanwhile, the craze about CBD oil increases each day, and whether you are in coffee shops or restaurants, the talk of the day is CBD oil and how it can help with this or that. Can CBD oil help relieve nausea? This article is your informant; peer into it to answer this question.


The Basics About CBD Oil

Since CBD oil is part of the mainstream, it is important to understand it fully. It is an active compound in cannabis plants and one of the 113 cannabinoids therein. It is popular for its abundance and its ability to present the desired effects without making a person feel high, and this is the main difference between it and THC that's structurally similar to it. Depending on the deliverable method in question, you can inhale, ingest, topically apply, or sublingually administer CBD oil.


Can CBD Oil Help with Nausea?

Since CBD oil is touted as safe and well-tolerated, people use it to manage different conditions. In fact, many people take the cannabinoid to manage nausea, but one may wonder if CBD oil is any efficacious for nausea. CBD oil does not stop nausea from developing; there are no studies to prove this. However, early research suggests that CBD oil could relieve nausea. The next section answers this.


How CBD Oil Might Improve Nausea

Some studies suggest that CBD oil might improve nausea, and one might wonder how this happens. There are many possibilities for positive observation. For instance, Parker et al. (2011) noted that cannabinoid might relieve nausea since it interacts with the serotonin hormone. This is a neurotransmitter that affects many crucial processes and functions in the body, including mood changes and general well-being. Still, more research is essential to uphold this before recommending CBD oil for nausea. In another instance, Rock et al. (2016) reported that CBD oil with THC could help chemo patients relieve themselves of nausea.


Can THC Help Relieve Nausea?

THC is the psychoactive component of cannabis plants that makes smoking marijuana have psychoactive effects on a person, even making him feel 'high.' Since CBD oils have the same number of atoms as CBD oil, meaning they are chemically similar in structures, you may want to know if it helps with nausea as well. Parker et al. (2011), quoted earlier, noted that THC could be doing the heavy-lifting job in the study that saw potential in CBD oil for nausea.


CBD Oil for Nausea: The Possible Formulations

Are you contemplating taking CBD oil for nausea? It is worth noting that there are three CBD formulations to explore, depending on personal preference. There is no better formulation than the other, and the existing types ensure that users have a variety to explore. The following are the three CBD formulations, based on the cannabinoid profile and the presence or absence of additional compounds;


  • Full-spectrum CBD oil; Boasts the whole range of cannabinoids, including CBD and THC, and features additional compounds, including terpenes and flavonoids. It is many people’s major pick because of the many compounds.
  • Broad-spectrum CBD oil; Features many compounds as full-spectrum CBD oil but does not have THC. It makes a good alternative if all you want is whole-range CBD oil without THC.
  • Isolate-based CBD oil; Is pure CBD without other compounds from cannabis plants. If you want less refined products, full-spectrum CBD oil would be the best option, but also try broad-spectrum CBD if you don’t want THC. Meanwhile, isolate CBD oil should be a favorite pick if you don’t like the earthy taste of CBD oil, terpenes, and flavonoids. Still, you could opt for it when you want to enjoy CBD oil in larger dosages.

CBD Oil Deliverables- Which One Should You Choose for Nausea?

As with CBD formulations, there are many options to explore. For instance, take CBD oil sublingually or orally, munch or chew CBD edibles, vape CBD e-juice, swallow CBD capsules, or topically apply CBD cream and balm on the skin. There is no better deliverable method; the choice depends on many factors, including why you are taking CBD in the first place. For nausea, try CBD tinctures put under the tongue, allow some seconds to elapse, and swallow. If you hate the earthy flavor of CBD oil, opt for CBD edibles like gummies, mints, and lozenges. People find relief from nausea by chewing cinnamon, lemon, ginger, and more. If you have CBD oil or edibles featuring these flavors, try them and hopefully get relief from nausea.


CBD Dosage for Nausea

One challenge facing CBD usage is the difficulty in measuring out dosages. The FDA does not regulate CBD oil, nor does the body recommend the dosages in which it should be taken. If you opt for CBD oil for nausea, you have to figure out the right dosages. The rule of thumb for CBD dosing is to start slow and keep it low, which applies to using CBD oil for nausea.


Conclusion

CBD oil cannot stop from developing. However, studies, especially involving chemotherapy patients, show that CBD oil could relieve people of nausea, which could be due to its interaction with serotonin. Still, caution is needed when using CBD oil for nausea, especially because of the lack of dosing information. As such, you need to take low doses and potency if you are starting a CBD regimen as you track how the body responds.


References

Parker, L. A., Rock, E. M., & Limebeer, C. L. (2011). Regulation Of Nausea And Vomiting By Cannabinoids. British Journal Of Pharmacology, 163(7), 1411–1422. Https://Doi.Org/10.1111/J.1476-5381.2010.01176.X.

Rock, E. M., Sticht, M. A., Limebeer, C. L., & Parker, L. A. (2016). Cannabinoid Regulation Of Acute And Anticipatory Nausea. Cannabis And Cannabinoid Research, 1(1), 113–121. Https://Doi.Org/10.1089/Can.2016.0006.

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