CBD oil and driving: everything you need to know

CBD oil is not illegal in the USA. Therefore, it is not illegal to take it while driving. However, taking too much of it results in poor judgment since it contains psychoactive side effects, including feeling "high."

CBD oil products are manufactured from organic hemp plants cultivated in various parts of the USA. The best producer of organic hemp includes Colorado, Kentucky, and Oregon, respectively. These regions are fertile and allow the growth of hemp without adding artificial fertilizers or pesticides. The hemp plant contains various elements, including terpenes, flavonoids, cannabidiol (CBD), and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). According to Freeman et al. (2020), THC is associated with intoxicating effects, unlike other elements, making it harmful to most CBD users. Some of the common side effects associated with THC are getting "high," anxiety, poor memory, and severe headaches. However, out of the three types of CBD, broad-spectrum and isolate are void of THC. Full-spectrum contains all the elements of the hemp plant, including THC.


CBD Oil and Driving

Driving requires one to be sober and avoid using any intoxicating substances that will result in poor judgments on the road, resulting in accidents that might lead to loss of lives. While using CBD oil, it is recommended to avoid driving. Here are some of the key things one should consider while taking CBD oil when driving;


The Type of CBD

If you intend to take CBD oil before driving, it is important to pay attention to the type of CBD oil.


Full Spectrum CBD

Full-spectrum CBD oil is manufactured using all the elements found in the hemp plant. Therefore, it entails terpenes, flavonoids, THC, and CBD. Taking highly concentrated terpenes and flavonoids won't impact the body. However, too much THC and CBD have intoxicating effects that might interfere with sound judgment on the road might result in fatal accidents. Taking too much full-spectrum CBD oil is likely to make you "high." According to Cohen et al. (2019), the hemp plant contains an insignificant amount of THC that is likely not to make someone have the "high" effect as marijuana. The Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) is strict on THC levels to ensure they don't exceed 0.3% per the 2018 Farm Bill. Although the full spectrum has an intoxicating tendency due to the presence of THC, it only occurs if taken in high concentrations.


Broad Spectrum

According to Sexton et al. (2016), broad-spectrum CBD would work best when used for health and wellness, such as stress, anxiety, and pain to driving. It is manufactured using all the elements found in the hemp plant except THC. Therefore, broad-spectrum exposes its users to enjoying entourage effect resulting from terpenes, flavonoids, and CBD. Also, it minimizes being exposed to THC-related side effects. However, the absence of THC is not a ticket to taking too much CBD oil and driving. Too much CBD results in THC-related side effects such as being anxious and feeling "high."


Isolate CBD Oil

Isolate oil is the pure form of CBD. It lacks other elements of the hemp plant, including terpenes, flavonoids, and THC. During extraction, they ensure all elements are removed to remain with CBD. However, the absence of THC is not a guarantee of safety for taking it while or before driving. According to Fischer et al. (2021), a slight increase in quantity results in THC-related side effects, including feeling "high," which results in poor judgment while driving.


The Concentration

CBD oil is manufactured at different potency levels to improve effectiveness. If you intend to take CBD oil before driving, consider low concentrations. Taking highly concentrated CBD oil, especially for novices, might be dangerous since the body is yet to get adapted. Even with low concentrations, beginners are likely to feel "high." For a CBD addict or veteran, consider taking lower concentrations to drive to minimize the normal effect.


Is CBD Oil Legal when Driving?

CBD products were legalized in 2018 under a Farm Bill. However, they had some restrictions. Although CBD oil is a legal product, they still have intoxicating effects that don't align with driving regulations. According to the FDA, which regulates ingestible products according to their laws, CBD products with THC levels below 0.3% are legal. Therefore, CBD oil users must ensure THC doesn't appear in drug tests while driving and are caught in the offense.


How Long Does CBD Oil Take in the Body?

The duration varies depending on several factors. The first, is the users' body chemistry. For a strong body, the impact will last for a shorter time than for people with weak immunity. Weak bodies cannot fight CBD within a short time, making it stay longer in the body system. Your experience depends on how long CBD oil will take in the system. CBD takes a shorter time for veterans than for novices. However, the products you have taken determine the effective kick-off duration. Products such as capsules and edibles take time for the user to feel the impact. Therefore avoid them if you intend to drive or take them in considerable amounts.


Can CBD Make you Sleepy?

Taking CBD oil is likely to make you sleepy. It provides a relaxing mood that attracts sleep, especially in a comfortable position, including driving. Therefore, consider taking small doses if you have taken CBD oil and intend to drive. Minor doses make you stay alert and awake for the longest time possible. However, the difference in body chemistry results in a unique reaction of CBD oil.


Conclusion

According to USA taking, CBD products while driving are not illegal. However, ensure it contains less than 0.3% THC since any product beyond that is illegal. Also, it is important to note the side effects of taking too much CBD. One of the negative side effects of CBD that don't align with driving is feeling "high." It results in poor judgment that might result in a road accident and even makes you lose your life. It is also important to note that CBD reacts differently to people depending on experience and body chemistry. Some people are likely to have negative side effects with low concentrations, and others might take time to feel the impact.


References

Cohen, K., Weizman, A., & Weinstein, A. (2019). Positive And Negative Effects Of Cannabis And Cannabinoids On Health. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 105(5), 1139-1147.

Fischer, B., Robinson, T., Bullen, C., Curran, V., Jutras-Aswad, D., Medina-Mora, M. E., ... & Hall, W. (2021). Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines (LRCUG) For Reducing Health Harms From Non-Medical Cannabis Use: A Comprehensive Evidence And Recommendations Update. International Journal Of Drug Policy, 103381.

Freeman, T. P., & Lorenzetti, V. (2020). ‘Standard THC Units’: A Proposal to Standardize Dose Across All Cannabis Products And Administration Methods. Addiction, 115(7), 1207-1216.

Sexton, M., Cuttler, C., Finnell, J. S., & Mischley, L. K. (2016). A Cross-Sectional Survey Of Medical Cannabis Users: Use Patterns And Perceived Efficacy. Cannabis And Cannabinoid Research, 1(1), 131-138.

{}