How to take CBD oil: dose, type, and more

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In need of taking CBD oil for consumption of CBD? Looking for a better CBD product that individuals can take the recommended dose accompanied with the respectful type, among others? These articles explain how best individuals can consume CBD dosage depending on the type and concentration. CBD oil is made by extracting CBD from the cannabis plant and diluting it with a carrier oil like hemp seed oil. One in three American adults have used CBD, and 66% of the U.S. population is familiar with CBD products. Despite the growing popularity of CBD oil, there are still a lot of speculations surrounding it.


How to Take CBD Oils


Sublingually

One can take CBD oil by placing it directly under the tongue. The part under the tongue is a capillary-rich area that will quickly ensure the CBD reaches the bloodstream. CBD oils have a high absorption rate and bioavailability caused by alcohol in their composition.


Additives and Flavors

Some types of CBD oils have a bitter taste. Some people have a distaste for painful thin, making them use it with additives to mask the bitterness. The alcohol present in CBD Oil gives it its bitter taste even though alcohol makes it taste sour as it ensures its long shelf life of five years.


Capsule

CBD Oils also come in the form of capsules. Capsules help maintain a consistent amount of CBD compounds in the body since all pills have the same size and composition as CBD Oil. After swallowing a CBD capsule, one might have to wait for thirty minutes before experiencing the desired effects.


Types of CBD Oils

Several CBD Oil products are being released into the markets every day. All these products fall into one of these three categories. They include:


Full Spectrum CBD Oil

According to Hazekamp (2018), the whole spectrum contains a slight trace of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) of up to 0.3% or more minor. Also, it has all the beneficial cannabinoids and compounds found in the cannabis plant, which include:


Cannabinoids

These are a group of substances found in the cannabis plant. Although more than one hundred cannabinoids have been identified, the main ones are CBD and THC. According to Shannon et al. (2019), cannabinoids have proven helpful in treating specific health conditions such as anxiety, epilepsy, sleep problems, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite the benefits that cannabinoids provide, consuming high amounts of THC leads to the risk of addiction and dependence.


Terpene

Terpene is a naturally occurring compound found in the cannabis plant. Even though there are about 20,000 terpenes, the hemp plant alone creates at least 200 of them. They are responsible for the aroma, taste, and fragrance of the cannabis plant. According to Nahler, Jones, & Russo (2019), Phyto cannabinoid-terpenoid preparation could help with depression, cognitive function, and anxiety.


Flavonoids

They are found in all kinds of plants, and cannabis has about twenty different flavonoids. They give the cannabis its dark green color.


Broad-spectrum

Russo, E. B. (2011). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid‐terpenoid entourage effects. British journal of pharmacology, 163(7), 1344-1364.

Russo (2011) explains that it is one of the primary forms of CBD and constitutes several naturally occurring compounds from the cannabis plant except for the Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Most broad-spectrum CBD oils do not have THC; some may have trace amounts.


Isolate

It is the purest form of CBD extracted from the plant and is devoid of other nutrients. CBD Isolates go through further refining, so they can only contain CBD. It is suitable for CBD users without ingesting its psychoactive component, THC. According to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), some of its side effects include appetite and weight infatuations, insomnia, diarrhea, fatigue, and irritability.


CBD Oil Dose


Why Should You know your CBD Oil Dose?

A dose refers to a measured quantity of medicine delivered as a unit. Many of the life-saving medications used by human beings every day become lethal poisons if misused. This knowledge should be enough to know the CBD oil dose recommended by doctors.


What to Consider When Selecting a CBD Oil Dose

People with poor immune systems cannot take a large amount of CBD Oil. Individuals under medication may need to consult their doctor first before using CBD Oil. CBD might interfere with medication levels in a patient's system.


What is The Right Dose of CBD Oil?

The right dose of CBD Oil does not exist. CBD Oil is not currently regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and there is no official recommended doses. The amount of CBD one should depend on various factors such as body weight, body chemistry, the condition being treated, and the concentration of CBD in each pill. If a doctor provides no recommendations for CBD, it is best to start with a small dosage and gradually increase it until one reaches the desired effect. The ideal dose of CBD varies from individual to individual.


Why is CBD Oil better than other CBD products such as Gummies?

CBD Oil works quicker than CBD gummies, especially when placed under the tongue to be absorbed directly into the bloodstream by capillaries. Also, CBD oils have high bioavailability and a high absorption rate. Compared to other types of CBD that have to be digested first.


Conclusion

CBD Oil and its products have brought immense benefits and revolution to the medicinal world ever since its legalization in the America Farm Bill. CBD Oils treat anxiety and depression. It is wise to know the types of CBD Oil, the ways of taking it, its benefits, and its dose.


References

Hazekamp, A. (2018). The trouble with CBD oil. Medical cannabis and cannabinoids, 1(1), 65-72.

Nahler, G., Jones, T. M., & Russo, E. B. (2019). Cannabidiol and significant hemp Phyto compounds contribute to the "Entourage Effect"; possible mechanisms. J. Altern. Complementary Integr. Med, 5.

Russo, E. B. (2011). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid‐terpenoid entourage effects. British journal of pharmacology, 163(7), 1344-1364.

Shannon, S., Lewis, N., Lee, H., & Hughes, S. (2019). Cannabidiol in anxiety and sleep: a large case series. The Permanente Journal, 23.

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